La vida hot springs resort ca-Carbon Canyon Chronicle: La Vida Mineral Springs Resort:

The retreat was given and directed by Yesenia B. What a wonderful experience! The retreat included guided fasting with fresh organic juices and vegetable broths made daily, as well as a variety of nutritional and detoxification supplements. In addition, colonics, Reiki, yoga sessions, a meditation class, two hikes along beautiful woodland and mountain trails and nutrition and educational workshops were offered. Yesenia was fantastic.

Times News Platforms. Hi unknown, thanks for sharing a little about your memories of La Vida--it sounds like a cool hot? Here you'll find information about the canyon's history, beauty, communities and issues that threaten to affect its character and special qualities. As for Sleepy Hollow, I had an uncle that lived there and the scariest thing during that time was the bars, people drinking vvida much and the car accidents on Carbon Canyon Road. I could crawl home! La vida hot springs resort ca filters.

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Their "flumes" channel the hot water into Sexy images with boobs of varying temperature. It is probably the most unusual part of Carbon Canyon, this large compound concealed in the hills north of Carbon Canyon Road just inside t I am not currently subscribed to PureWow. Was trying to find pictures of La Vida from the mid's La vida hot springs resort ca I worked there to show to my nephew. Thank you for your interest in La Vida Hot Spring. Four hours later, a mandatory evacuation order was given and early Sunday morning the fire was within yards of our house. Follow PureWow on Pinterest. I am so elated that someone is taking an interest in redeveloping La Vida hot springs. Follow by Email. Highway

It has been years since the warm waters of La Vida Hot Springs bubbled up unfettered from an underground source.

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  • Though the development of modern civilization is fast encroaching upon it, Carbon Canyon for decades was a rural oasis lying between the suburban sprawl of Orange and San Bernardino counties.
  • Located at the foot of the San Jacinto mountains, La Dolce Vita is ideally located in an upscale, residential neighborhood, located 5 minutes from Downtown Palm Springs' most popular attractions, restaurants, shops, and nightlife.
  • This blog is about the unique setting of Carbon Canyon, a rural oasis lying between the suburban sprawl of Orange and San Bernardino counties.

This blog is about the unique setting of Carbon Canyon, a rural oasis lying between the suburban sprawl of Orange and San Bernardino counties. Here you'll find information about the canyon's history, beauty, communities and issues that threaten to affect its character and special qualities.

Readers are encouraged to submit comments, explore links, and make suggestions to improve the blog. Thanks for checking out the Carbon Canyon Chronicle! An article, though, in the 22 July issue of the Times by Esther Schrader appeared presenting hope of a renaissance for the resort.

The piece began by stating: It has been years since the warm waters of La Vida Hot [Mineral] Springs bubbled up unfettered from an underground source. The gracious old hotel where generations of weekend escapees from Los Angeles once lounged is boarded up and crumbling. But, it went on, there was a proposal submitted earlier that month by a Japanese businessman, Tadayao Hata, to rebuild La Vida with a slightly larger hotel, a new pool to add to the two that sit dry at the springs, graceful wooden bridges across a gurgling creek and a new clientele seeking what the old patrons did--peace, calm and soft warm water.

In addition to giving some history, which has been covered in several postings on this blog, Schrader also mentioned that La Vida's first life as a hot springs resort came to an end with the fire, which ended then-owner Leo Hayashi's short-lived dream of a renaissance at the dilapidated oasis.

Hayashi bought the resort in and had spoken for years of rebuilding the hotel. But money was tight, and by the time the blaze ripped through the uninsured place, only a few dozen people regularly frequented the pools of La Vida.

These days the old bridge across the creek leading to the hotel tilts into the steam choked with undergrowth. Cornstalks [actually, the highly invasive and flammable arundo ] are growing high on the banks.

The faded hotel is pocked with broken windows and trash. Under his plan, the room hotel would grow slightly, to 15 rooms, with a new parking lot serving it, and the spa would offer massages, facials and other beauty treatments along with the baths. Notably, although Hayashi sold the resort to Hata, he was, in , still managing the site and noted that, with the new plan, "we're hoping to attract Japanese tourists, you know.

I don't know if helmets and hot springs are the best combination. Anyway, although Brea was supportive of the Hata plans and the community development director stated "we'd like to see the place come back.

It's part of Brea history," he also acknowledged that "they'd need to do an awful lot of work to bring it back. About this time, the cafe closed and was razed, leading to a continuing deterioration of the site, which was almost unrecognizable as anything but pure abandoned property.

Even when the real estate market "recovered", what followed was another bubble, built almost exclusively on skyrocketing equity artifically supported by "creative" mortgages. For a few years before the Triangle Complex Fire in November, a banner hung precariously on the misshapen chain link fence that lined Carbon Canyon Road advertising the place for sale. Ironically, a biker interviewed for the article noted that the appeal of La Vida was "for the solitude.

It's always been a really great place for people to get away from city life. The massive building boom in the Inland Empire, the use of Carbon Canyon Road as an alternate route to the 60 and 91 Freeways for westbound commuters, and, yes, the future threat of new homes in the Canyon, make La Vida increasingly less remote.

It should be added that the groundshaking, window rattling roar of many motorcyclists and, to be fair, plenty of cars and trucks rumbling and roaring through the Canyon renders that comment about "solitude" patently absurd a great deal of the time!

At any rate, it is really hard to imagine what a developer would do with La Vida. Could the site be redeveloped as a restaurant? Would enough people go there to make it profitable? Could a revived spa really work given just how much of an investment it would take to build almost completely from scratch?

Would worsening traffic conditions and infrastructure demands preclude commercial uses of the site? Moreover, a rezoning to residential use would seem to be infeasible. One could, however, easily imagine the site as a park. A cleaned up site could have picnic tables, walking trails, a new bridge across a cleaned-up Carbon [Canyon] Creek, and other passive-use amenities. Moreover, since the community development director in noted that the site was "a part of Brea history," La Vida could be designated a city historic landmark and interpretive signs could be installed discussing the history of the site from native American uses of the springs to the modern resort.

Security, however, would be a problem, especially against graffiti and vandalism, and it would not be hard to imagine the site as a haven for drug dealing and use and other illicit activities without a regular police presence. Finally, even in its unkempt and degraded state, the owner would obviously want "top dollar" for the site and it is difficult to see Brea having the interest, ability, or will to buy the property.

As it is, in this economy, nothing will happen there for some time to come. Still, it'd be nice to think that there would be a viable future for the site, other than as a weed-choked relic. Post a Comment. Carbon Canyon Chronicle. An earlier post on this blog covered a Los Angeles Times article about La Vida at left, in much better days, which was still, it appeared then, a viable business.

Three years later, however, a fire roared through the resort and destroyed a considerable portion of it, basically leaving only the restaurant untouched and in operation. No comments:. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom. Follow by Email. Search Posts from the Carbon Canyon Chronicle! History Roundup O. History Roundup. Wikipedia entry for Sleepy Hollow a work in progress? Official website of St. Popular Posts on the Carbon Canyon Chronicle.

Joseph's Hill of Hope: Cult or the true Catholicism? It is probably the most unusual part of Carbon Canyon, this large compound concealed in the hills north of Carbon Canyon Road just inside t Some digging around in the archives of the Los Angeles Times recently yielded some interesting material concerning the change in management Year-Round Skiing in Carbon Canyon?

This is a follow-up to one of the first posts on this blog, back in summer , about St. Joseph's Hill of Hope—City of God, the breakw Ghost Tales in Carbon Canyon! Come to think of it, St. Joseph's Hill of Hope isn't the only spiritual aspect of Carbon Canyon. A little gander OK, where does th Fundenberg and which became A banner has appeared in recent days on eastbound Carbon Canyon Road just before Olinda Village announcing that a new restaurant, Stones Smo Literally got home ten minutes ago and am now hearing the first flow of cars heading eastbound on Carbon Canyon Road, whi This is not a post about the history of the British in Chino Hills though that would probably be smashing , but, instead, a sketch of anoth Triangle Complex Fire: Sylvan Scenes Spared In the eastern end of Soquel Canyon, the damage in the canyon's bottomlands was much less than in the west.

This beautiful view on a dirt road looking south shows a relatively unscathed area. Taken 30 November The smoke on the right was a flareup in the Canyon, but we had no idea how bad things had gotten on the Brea side or how fortunate we were on the Chino Hills side.

As I left, I stopped to take this image with my cheap camera, but, as a neighbor said in a phone call to another neighbor a few hours later, "it doesn't look good. Four hours later, a mandatory evacuation order was given and early Sunday morning the fire was within yards of our house. High winds pushed the fire northwest through Yorba Linda. When I went to my local fire station, the fire was not heading towards Carbon Canyon, but that all changed with the winds died down by evening.

Early Sunday morning the 16th, the Canyon was in the line of fire! Old Carbon Canyon Road now Ginseng Lane The path of the old roadway looking west would meet up with the current road only a few hundred feet further, but a home and private driveway are in the old right-of-way. Taken 6 August Residents of Soquel Canyon Locals eye an outsider with suspicion, 6 July

Wilbur Hot Springs is 22 miles east of Clear Lake and has an adjacent hotel which is more than years old. Please have the new owner of the property contact me at to discuss their plans to rebuild this vital health historical California heritage site. Well look no further! Hi Joe, thanks for the comment and recollections of your visits to La Vida. Early Sunday morning the 16th, the Canyon was in the line of fire!

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Carbon Canyon Chronicle: La Vida Mineral Springs History from the Los Angeles Times

This blog is about the unique setting of Carbon Canyon, a rural oasis lying between the suburban sprawl of Orange and San Bernardino counties. Here you'll find information about the canyon's history, beauty, communities and issues that threaten to affect its character and special qualities. Readers are encouraged to submit comments, explore links, and make suggestions to improve the blog. Thanks for checking out the Carbon Canyon Chronicle! Thanks for your great blog! The article on La Vida is so interesting.

We were just exploring the area today- trying to imagine where the pools and hotel were. Found the warm water too! Hello Theresa, what a coincidence that I saw your comment after just now posting something on La Vida and the images I took on the day the Brea side of Carbon Canyon was reopened, a month ago yesterday. If you check it out, you'll see a view looking east across Carbon [Canyon] Creek where the hotel and pool were.

I wasn't able to get to that part of the property last month and want to go back there, if I can. Another view shows a steam vent I stumbled upon in the hillside. At any rate, thanks for visiting and please come back to see what's new. Very interesting, I spent most of my childhood at La Vida Hot Springs; thanks for the history lesson.

The water looked kinda icky - but it was fun. My grandmother had a hip problem and the water helped her. Thanks for the article - I had begun to think I imagined the trips made there! Hi Ekim and Anonymous, I occasionally troll back through old entries to see if there are recent comments and came across yours. Thanks for stopping by and glad you found the post useful. There is quite a bit elsewhere on the blog about La Vida which you may want to check out. I have a few comments to add regarding the La Vida Hot Springs from a family genealogical research project I've been pursuing for the past several decades.

My grandparents sold their farm in northern Missouri around and moved to Southern California. I have been told by several ancestors - now deceased - that my grandfather, James Monroe Williams, managed the La Vida Hot Springs for a number of years between and approximately My father, Nicholas Monroe Williams, was born in in Clearwater Paramount and he and several of his brothers and a sister and some cousins have told me about the cement tubs that were used at the hot springs.

I would love to hear from anyone who can verify that James and Mae Williams ran these hot springs during this time period. Nick Williams. Thank you for your interest in La Vida Hot Spring. I have heard the existing property owner, at long last, would like to re-develop the area perhaps by turning it into a drive-in cafe. But the owner will first need some professional assistance in digging the hot spring.

Would appreciate it if anyone can recommend a service provider or enlighten us on the permit matter if required. Hello Nick, this is very interesting. It has been said, as I think I mentioned elsewhere, that the water was first noticed in modern times by oil explorations on the site.

I haven't seen any reference to the Williams family at La Vida, which isn't to say that this means anything, but maybe they were there because of use of the water by those working in the Olinda oil fields? Maybe something will come to light on this. Thanks for checking out the Chronicle! Hello Anonymous, is there a new owner of the La Vida property? Leo Hayashi had owned it since the mids and ran the resort until the late s.

I would assume that the city would issue permits for any subsurface investigations by geotechnical specialists? Thanks for stopping by. Hello Nick, I did a little poking around with census info and found that the Williams family was living in the Clearwater precinct of Downey Township in and James M. Williams was a grocery store owner.

About or so, he died, however, and his widow was living in Huntington Beach by Their oldest child was born there about and their second child was born two years later in California, so the date, of course, is correct for their move to California. The problem will be linking them to La Vida from , though the dates certainly match up well. One significant fact in the history of "La Vida Hot Springs" as it was known in This was right after I got out of the U.

I quit one night when the old guy who ran the place had the TV at the bar on while I was playing and I asked him "What do you want me to do??!! I went into Real Estate. John Boyer AZ. Hi John, thanks for checking in and leaving the comment. If you have something more you'd like to say about your reminiscences of La Vida, let me know. I'd be happy to post it on its own. I used to go there once a week in the 80's. Some Koreans took it over and apparently they ran a brothel there downstairs.

I told some friends that ran a holistic medical group about it and they and Buddy Ebsen were thinking of buying it but it would have been too much work. Too bad, that water, alkaline based, was the best ever.

They'd take you to a room and wrap you in wool blankets for an hour and put an ice cold towel around your head.

Dennis the attendant would laugh and fix us up. Those Koreans really effed up that place, a potential gold mine that eventually crumbled away in history.

Glen Ivy then ended up being my hot springs spot till I moved to Hawaii. Great memories of La Vida No, I never got any 'mammaries' there Was trying to find pictures of La Vida from the mid's when I worked there to show to my nephew. Chris Cromwell was the owner and I was one of many servers at that time. Live music both inside and outside with folks sitting on lawn chairs on a Sunday afternoon. Good times, good memories and thankfully we survived one of the many fires in The Canyon during that decade.

Hi Pamela, thanks for the comment and, if you have any photos that you'd like to post here, let me know. I have since learned that James and Mae managed La Vida in after moving to a house across the "road" actually a wagon trail up the canyon from the hot springs. Their white clapboard house was butted-up against the hillside on the south side of the canyon, opposite the hot springs. I would love to get a photograph of their house in Carbon Canyon! Paul, I have been looking through your earlier blogs and links regarding the La Vida Hot Springs, and have discovered two very interesting "coincidences" that may have a connection to my grandfather, James M.

Williams, and his position as manager of La Vida Hot Springs in around The first pertains to Edward F. Gaines, a "farmer" and property owner in the Olinda Village who actually lived in Carbon Canyon. Gaines supposedly moved to the Carbon Canyon area after What is interesting to me is that he moved there from Clearwater now the city of Paramount where he farmed Secondly, in the remembrances of Jack Gauldin, a resident of Olinda until , Mr.

Gauldin describes using two dozen mules and about 27 men to construct the first rudimentary road through Carbon Canyon in or What is interesting to me is that he is quoted as saying "There was an old gent by the name of Jim Williams who lived in there Knowing what my father has said about his father's personality, I can believe that he could very well have said this to the workers.

Hello: We began to frequent La Vida in the late 's, around and thereafter, until the untimely destruction from a cooking fire we think. The hotel still had rooms and I remember staying there in the early 's. La Vida had the best protocols: soak submersed in adjusted La Vida very hot water individual tile stalls with iced cups of the La Vida Mineral Water to drink; then proceed to the dry cedar-lined sauna to sweat; then proceed to the cool-down room, where you were snugly wrapped in a clean sheet on individual padded tables, your face surround covered by iced terry towel and your body covered with a thick plastic sheet on top of which was placed a very thick wool blanket.

Please have the new owner of the property contact me at to discuss their plans to rebuild this vital health historical California heritage site. Thanks, Chris McKinney. My La Vida visits were all in the mid 70's to early 80's. I remember the sound of the canyon wihile soaking in the outdoor mineral water pool.

I remember the massage rooms and the wonderful relaxing Swedish massages. Most of all, I remember getting a hydro bath, sinking deep into the HOT mineral water and letting the jets really work your muscles.

Then into the sauna - a nice very hot dry sauna - with some mineral water to sprinkle on the hot rocks. Lastly, into the blanket sweat room - cool, clean sheet on a padded bench, being wrapped up like a mummy in the sheet and then a in a heavy wool blanket, tucked up close around your neck, and finally a towel soaked in ice and mineral water covering your entire face and head.

Lying there, limp and relaxed for 40 minutes. Oh, I miss La Vida. If the new owner s bring it back, I'm there, definitely there. And I'll bring lots of friends. I have been looking for the reason the La Vida hot springs went out of business and I came across this via my wonderful daughter who did a little research and forwarded this to me.

I am so elated that someone is taking an interest in redeveloping La Vida hot springs. I miss seeing those beautiful pools of water when I was a child and we traveled the canyon back and forth through there.

I do know one thing, who ever rebuilds it will probably have to think "Bigger" when it come to parking. With the increase of the population, La Vida will have a lot more visitors than one ever imagined.