Violent deaths of roman emporers-The Worst Roman Emperors: 8 of the Bloodiest Rulers - HistoryExtra

Great power often comes with great responsibility—and risk. Just ask the men who presided over the Roman Empire some 1, years ago: One-fifth of these emperors met violent ends at the hands of their subjects. As Laura Geggel reports for Live Science , bouts of low rainfall resulted in inadequate harvests, leaving Roman soldiers malnourished and more inclined to mutiny. Christian and co-author Liam Elbourne of St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, Canada, arrived at this conclusion after comparing ancient climate data with statistics on military mutinies and emperor assassinations between 27 B.

By the time the coach reached Bithynia, a terrible smell emanated from it. Serbian-born Gratian67th Emperor r. However, that Violeng was cut short by American asian porn illness that was to fell him in Eburacum now York on February 4th, Throughout the final years of the Western Empire — the Eastern emperor was considered the senior deths, and a Western emperor was only legitimate if recognized as such by the Eastern emperor. Julian63rd Emperor r. Nero is the Roman Emperor we all love to hate, and not without reason. For his victories, he received the titles Germanicus Maximus Violeng Persicus Maximus. The empire was known for its autocratic rulers; many of them were megalomaniacs more concerned with their own power and wellbeing than that of their subjects. Listed as an emperor by historical convention. Ruthless and violent, Violent deaths of roman emporers emperors are famous for their tyrannical reigns of terror.

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Tiberius more or less retired to Capri for the rest of his long life, only returning to Rome a few times. July 2,RavennaItalia. The bloody rise of Augustus. He even solicited men in the Imperial Palace, standing completely naked in the doorway of his favorite bedroom and purring at every passerby, even his Praetorian Guards. Gordian III32nd Emperor r. They then sent in his favorite wrestler, a gladiator Violsnt Narcissus, who strangled him in his bath. He was only 13 years old at his proclamation, younger than any Marissa tome naked sole emperor veaths the unified Empire. Causes of death graph found here on Reddit. Augustus maintained a facade of Republican rule, rejecting monarchical titles but calling himself princeps senatus first man of the council [1] and princeps civitatis first citizen of the state. While on the run to Spain from a rebelling general, he was assassinated in February in Vicus Helena now Elne in Francethus sort of fulfilling a prophecy that he would die in the arms of his grandmother - Helena, Violent deaths of roman emporers mother of Constantine.

Ruthless and violent, Roman emperors are famous for their tyrannical reigns of terror.

  • For that last metric, the podcast also produced this map, showing the locations where Roman emperors expired.
  • The Roman Empire was vast at its peak and its influence is still felt today in our forms of military, government, and society in general.
  • The Roman emperors were the rulers of the Roman Empire dating from the granting of the title of Augustus to Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus by the Roman Senate in 27 BC, after major roles played by the populist dictator and military leader Julius Caesar.
  • Ruthless and violent, Roman emperors are famous for their tyrannical reigns of terror.
  • Ah, the Roman Empire.
  • Selecting the top five worst Roman emperors of all time isn't a difficult task, thanks to myriad Roman historians, historical fiction, documentaries, and even movies and television programs, all of which illustrate the moral excesses of many of the rulers of Rome and its colonies.

The following 28 pages are in this category, out of 28 total. This list may not reflect recent changes learn more. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Subcategories This category has the following 3 subcategories, out of 3 total. Pages in category "Murdered Roman emperors" The following 28 pages are in this category, out of 28 total. A Aemilianus Avidius Cassius. C Carausius Carinus Claudius Constans. D Dalmatius Domitian. F Florianus. G Gallienus Trebonianus Gallus Geta emperor. J Julius Nepos Julius Saturninus.

L Laelianus. P Postumus. S Saloninus Septimius usurper Severus Alexander. Namespaces Category Talk. Views Read Edit View history. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Historically [ by whom? Presented by:. Died He erected statues of his captain of the Guard, Lucius Sejanus, all over the city, and gave all the tasks of ruling to him. Founded in by Visual Capitalist and Texas Precious Metals , the Money Project will look at the evolving nature of money, and will try to answer the difficult questions that prevent us from truly understanding the role that money plays in finance, investments, and accumulating wealth. Was overthrown by Stephen in , who briefly ruled as senior emperor for a few weeks until he himself was overthrown by Constantine VII. Some believe that Domitian may have had a hand in his brother's death.

Violent deaths of roman emporers. About the Money Project

For most of the period from to , there was more than one recognised senior emperor, with the division usually based in geographic terms. This division was consistently in place after the death of Theodosius I in , which historians have dated as the division between the Western Roman Empire and the Eastern Roman Empire.

The fall of the Western Roman Empire , and so the end of a separate list of emperors below, is dated either from the de facto date of when Romulus Augustulus was deposed by the Germanic Herulians led by Odoacer or the de jure date of , on the death of Julius Nepos , when Eastern Emperor Zeno ended recognition of a separate Western court.

In the period that followed, the Empire is usually treated by historians as the Byzantine Empire governed by the Byzantine Emperors , although this designation is not used universally, and continues to be a subject of specialist debate today.

In the 7th century, Heraclius meets the Companions of the Prophet Muhammad , thus establishing the first meeting with Islam and later facing the Arab Muslim conquests. The line of emperors continued until the death of Constantine XI Palaiologos during the Fall of Constantinople in , when the remaining territories were captured by the Ottoman Empire under Mehmed II.

Counting all individuals to have possessed the full imperial title, including those who did not technically rule in their own right e. The emperors listed in this article are those generally agreed to have been 'legitimate' emperors, and who appear in published regnal lists. In Augustus' original formulation, the princeps was selected by either the Senate or "the people" of Rome, but quite quickly the legions became an acknowledged stand-in for "the people.

The coercion that frequently resulted was implied in this formulation. Furthermore, a sitting emperor was empowered to name a successor and take him on as apprentice in government and in that case the Senate had no role to play, although it sometimes did when a successor lacked the power to inhibit bids by rival claimants.

By the medieval or Byzantine period, the very definition of the Senate became vague as well, adding to the complication. Lists of legitimate emperors are therefore partly influenced by the subjective views of those compiling them, and also partly by historical convention. Many of the 'legitimate' emperors listed here acceded to the position by usurpation, and many 'illegitimate' claimants had a legitimate claim to the position. Historically [ by whom? So for instance, Aurelian , though acceding to the throne by usurpation, was the sole and undisputed monarch between and , and thus was a legitimate emperor.

Gallienus, though not in control of the whole Empire, and plagued by other claimants, was the legitimate heir of the legitimate emperor Valerian. Claudius Gothicus , though acceding illegally, and not in control of the whole Empire, was the only claimant accepted by the Senate, and thus, for his reign, was the legitimate emperor. Equally, during the Year of the Four Emperors , all claimants, though not undisputed, were at some point accepted by the Senate and are thus included; conversely, during the Year of the Five Emperors neither Pescennius Niger nor Clodius Albinus were accepted by the Senate, and are thus not included.

There are a few examples where individuals were made co-emperor, but never wielded power in their own right typically the child of an emperor ; these emperors are legitimate, but are not included in regnal lists, and in this article are listed together with the senior emperor.

After , the list of emperors in the East is based on the same general criteria, with the exception that the emperor only had to be in undisputed control of the Eastern part of the empire, or be the legitimate heir of the Eastern emperor. The situation in the West is more complex. Throughout the final years of the Western Empire — the Eastern emperor was considered the senior emperor, and a Western emperor was only legitimate if recognized as such by the Eastern emperor.

Furthermore, after the Western emperor ceased to be a relevant figure and there was sometimes no claimant at all. For the sake of historical completeness, all Western Emperors after are included in this list, even if they were not recognized by the Eastern Empire; [11] some of these technically illegitimate emperors are included in regnal lists, while others are not. For instance, Romulus Augustulus was technically a usurper who ruled only the Italian peninsula and was never legally recognized.

However, he was traditionally considered the "last Roman Emperor" by 18th and 19th century western scholars and his overthrow by Odoacer used as the marking point between historical epochs, and as such he is usually included in regnal lists.

However, modern scholarship has confirmed that Romulus Augustulus' predecessor, Julius Nepos continued to rule as emperor in the other Western holdings and as a figurehead for Odoacer's rule in Italy until Nepos' death in Since the question of what constitutes an emperor can be ambiguous, and dating the "fall of the Western Empire" arbitrary, this list includes details of both figures.

Note: all dates AD hereafter. Note: To maintain control and improve administration, various schemes to divide the work of the Roman Emperor by sharing it between individuals were tried after The "Tetrarchy" proclaimed by Diocletian in split the empire into two halves each to be ruled separately by two emperors, a senior "Augustus", and a junior "Caesar". Note: Theodosius I was the last person to rule both halves of the Roman Empire, dividing the administration between his sons Arcadius and Honorius on his death.

Constans II. Note: The classical Roman Empire is usually said to have ended with the deposition of Romulus Augustulus, with its continuation in the East referred to by modern scholars as the Byzantine Empire.

Starved to death in Limnae in Cappadocia by Zeno. Christopher Lekapenos. Constantine Lekapenos. In a monastery as a monk after having been overthrown. Christopher died in August of Both Stephen and Constantine died in exile as monks; Stephen on Easter on Lesbos and Constantine in on Samothrace trying to escape exile and reclaim imperial power.

Deposed, blinded, castrated and tonsured after attempting to sideline Zoe and her sister Theodora. Andronikos Doukas. Constantine Doukas. Alexios Komnenos. Accidentally cut himself on a poisoned arrow. Alexios died in Attaleia on 2 August of a fever.

John Komnenos. Captured by crusaders of the newly founded Latin Empire and publicly executed. Note: Between and there was an interregnum when Constantinople was occupied by the crusaders of the Fourth Crusade and the Empire was divided into the Empire of Nicaea , the Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus , which were all contenders for rule of the Empire.

The Laskarid dynasty of the Empire of Nicaea is considered the legitimate continuation of the Roman Empire because they had the support of the Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople and managed to re-take Constantinople. John died 22 September at Thessaloniki , Andronikos died aged 7 on September 24th, Refused to surrender Constantinople to the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II and died fighting during the final Ottoman attack. Although there were no formal succession laws in place within the empire which would designate a legitimate successor of Constantine XI as emperor, [21] some of his relatives claimed the title after his death.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about legitimate Roman emperors. For other individuals claiming the title of Emperor, see List of Roman usurpers. Main article: Principate. Main article: Julio-Claudian dynasty. Main articles: Year of the Four Emperors and Flavian dynasty. Main article: Nerva—Antonine dynasty. Main articles: Year of the Five Emperors and Severan dynasty.

Main article: Dominate. Main articles: Tetrarchy and Constantinian dynasty. Main article: Valentinian dynasty. Main article: Western Roman Empire. Main article: Theodosian dynasty. See also: Fall of the Western Roman Empire.

Main article: List of Byzantine emperors. See also: House of Leo. See also: Byzantine Empire under the Justinian dynasty. See also: Byzantine Empire under the Heraclian dynasty. Main article: Twenty Years' Anarchy. See also: Byzantine Empire under the Isaurian dynasty. Main article: Byzantine Empire under the Nikephorian dynasty. See also: Byzantium under the Amorian dynasty. See also: Macedonian dynasty and Byzantine Empire under the Macedonian dynasty.

See also: Doukas. See also: Komnenos and Byzantine Empire under the Komnenos dynasty. See also: Angelos and Byzantine Empire under the Angelos dynasty.

See also: Laskaris and Empire of Nicaea. See also: Palaiologos and Byzantine Empire under the Palaiologos dynasty. Ancient Rome portal Monarchy portal. Although not completely defeated until , they were not formally accepted by the senate and were therefore not technically reigning emperors.

Holland, T. Oxford University Press , Wall Street Journal. Retrieved Retrieved 30 September Aurelian and the Third Century. London: Routledge. Retrieved January 6, Byzantine Empresses. Roman emperors by epoch. List of Roman emperors Roman Empire Family tree. Year of the 6 Emperors Gordian dynasty — Illyrian emperors — Gallic emperors — Britannic emperors — Tetrarchies — Constantinian dynasty — Valentinian dynasty — Theodosian dynasty — Latin emperors — Holy Roman emperors — Roman and Byzantine emperors.

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Views Read Edit View history. In other projects Wikimedia Commons. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. September 23, 63 BC, Rome , Italia. Great-nephew and adopted son of Julius Caesar ; became de facto emperor as a result of the 'first settlement' between himself and the Roman Senate. August 19, 14 AD aged 75 Natural causes. November 16, 42 BC, Rome , Italia. Natural son of Livia Drusilla , Augustus' third wife, by a previous marriage; stepbrother and third husband of Julia the Elder , daughter of Augustus; adopted by Augustus as his son and heir.

August 31, 12 AD, Antium , Italia. Great-nephew and adoptive grandson of Tiberius; natural son of Germanicus ; great-grandson of Augustus. Uncle of Caligula; brother of Germanicus; nephew of Tiberius; great-nephew and step-grandson of Augustus; proclaimed emperor by the Praetorian Guard.

October 13, 54 AD aged 63 Probably poisoned by his wife Agrippina the Younger , in favour of her son Nero, possibly natural causes. December 15, 37 AD, Antium , Italia. Great-nephew, stepson, son-in-law and adopted son of Claudius; nephew of Caligula; great-great-nephew of Tiberius; grandson of Germanicus; great-great-grandson of Augustus.

June 9, 68 AD aged 30 Committed suicide after being declared a public enemy by the Senate. April 28, 32 AD, Ferentinum , Italia. September 24, 15 AD, Rome , Italia. November 17, 9 AD, Falacrine , Italia. December 30, 39 AD, Rome , Italia. October 24, 51 AD, Rome , Italia. November 8, 30, Narni , Italia.

September 18, 53, Italica , Hispania Baetica. Adopted son and heir of Nerva. His reign marked the geographical and philantrophical peak of the empire.

January 24, 76, Italica , Hispania Baetica or Rome. September 19, 86, Near Lanuvium , Italia. March aged 39 Natural causes Plague. August 31, , Lanuvium , Italia.

August 1, , Alba , Italia. April 11, , Leptis Magna , Libya. Seized power with support of Pannonian legions [a]. The Roman Empire as we know it ended with Theodosius I who, despite his efforts, could not secure the Empire for his sons. His sons quickly lost control of the throne and the Empire fell into turmoil again, eventually leading to the sack of Rome in AD and the eventual dissolution of the Western Roman Empire.

The Eastern Roman Empire — later known as the Byzantine Empire — survived and even thrived for another millennium until it was conquered in AD. Want to learn more about Roman history?

I highly recommend this excellent podcast called The History of Rome. To me, the story it tells is that some Roman Emperors rules a long time, some did not. Completely separately it seems like they died from separate causes. The emperors with short periods of rule, I cannot tell how they died. There is nothing inherent in the chart to indicate this is a continuous stretch of history, or what the ordering of the rulers are.

I think part of the problem is taking a time-based data series and forcing it into a bar chart. My first thought at a workaround for that would be to log scale this chart, but that seems like an odd thing to do when the largest value is in the double digits.

Time is actually represented on the x-axis: The emperors are ordered in the order that they reigned. So Augustus was the first emperor and Theodosius was the last emperor. Have you considered a different method of of visualizing the bars? Oh shoot, that totally slipped my mind this time because I was replicating the color scheme from the previous version. This blog is my labor of love, and I've spent hundreds of hours working on the projects that you'll read about here.

Generally, I write about data visualization and machine learning, and sometimes explore out-of-the-box projects at the intersection of the two.

I hope you enjoy my projects as much as I have. If you would like to use one of my graphs on your website or in a publication, please feel free to do so with appropriate attribution, but I would appreciate it if you email me first to let me know. Click on the image for a larger version In the visualization above, we see the fairly sordid history of the Roman Empire. About Randy Olson. Tagged with: emperor , history , roman empire.

Veni, Vidi, Gone: A Death Map of Roman Emperors - Big Think

Ah, the Roman Empire. One of the greatest empires to conquer the known world of ancient Europe. At its height, every man desired to sit on the throne, making the Roman Emperor one of the more precarious roles in ancient history. We always hear about the greatest and worst Emperors — Caesar Augustus and Caligula, for example — but we so rarely hear about the other Emperors who lost their lives in service of — and sometimes in detriment to — the Empire. Then earlier this week, another user charted out the causes of death of the Roman Emperors.

It seemed only natural to combine the two to show the reigns and deaths of the Roman Emperors. All of this data comes from Wikipedia , who already had the entire line of Emperors sorted out into a table. In the visualization above, we see the fairly sordid history of the Roman Empire.

Well over half of the Emperors met some form of premature and violent end, with the average reign lasting only 8 years throughout the history of the Empire. Nearly all of the Emperors during this period died violently, either by assassination or in battle.

The Crisis only came to an end when Diocletian , a military commander of low birth, came into power. The Roman Empire as we know it ended with Theodosius I who, despite his efforts, could not secure the Empire for his sons.

His sons quickly lost control of the throne and the Empire fell into turmoil again, eventually leading to the sack of Rome in AD and the eventual dissolution of the Western Roman Empire. The Eastern Roman Empire — later known as the Byzantine Empire — survived and even thrived for another millennium until it was conquered in AD.

Want to learn more about Roman history? I highly recommend this excellent podcast called The History of Rome. To me, the story it tells is that some Roman Emperors rules a long time, some did not. Completely separately it seems like they died from separate causes.

The emperors with short periods of rule, I cannot tell how they died. There is nothing inherent in the chart to indicate this is a continuous stretch of history, or what the ordering of the rulers are. I think part of the problem is taking a time-based data series and forcing it into a bar chart.

My first thought at a workaround for that would be to log scale this chart, but that seems like an odd thing to do when the largest value is in the double digits. Time is actually represented on the x-axis: The emperors are ordered in the order that they reigned. So Augustus was the first emperor and Theodosius was the last emperor. Have you considered a different method of of visualizing the bars? Oh shoot, that totally slipped my mind this time because I was replicating the color scheme from the previous version.

This blog is my labor of love, and I've spent hundreds of hours working on the projects that you'll read about here. Generally, I write about data visualization and machine learning, and sometimes explore out-of-the-box projects at the intersection of the two. I hope you enjoy my projects as much as I have.

If you would like to use one of my graphs on your website or in a publication, please feel free to do so with appropriate attribution, but I would appreciate it if you email me first to let me know. Click on the image for a larger version In the visualization above, we see the fairly sordid history of the Roman Empire. About Randy Olson. Tagged with: emperor , history , roman empire. Travis says:. November 1, at PM. Randy Olson says:. Seth says:. November 2, at PM.

Jonas says:. November 7, at AM. About this blog. Recent Posts. Common Topics. Randal S. Responsive Theme powered by WordPress.