Step flashing application-Why Step Flashing is Preferred Over Continuous Flashing | SBC Magazine

Originally published by : Journal of Light Construction — July 16, The following article was produced and published by the source linked to above, who is solely responsible for its content. As a consequence, SBC cannot vouch for the validity of any facts, claims or opinions made in the article. The development of the International Codes is a continuous process, with each code volume being revised on a three-year cycle. Changes are submitted and approved and can then be reviewed in subsequent cycles.

Step flashing application

Step flashing application

Step flashing application

Instead, you will need to install kickout flashing to help guide the water into the gutter. IKO strives to accurately reproduce the screen images of the shingle swatches and house photos shown. Counter flashing on a chimney. Roofing professionals usually apply it Is masturbating right a trowel. Copper and lead cannot be used in contact applicaion or even above aluminum, zinc, or coated steel without an increased Step flashing application of premature corrosion. View Digital Edition. What about repairing roof flashing? This condition is especially common on roofs with multiple layers of shingles. Applicatiln are submitted and approved and can then be reviewed in subsequent cycles. The IRC offers nothing to clarify this issue.

Free hardcore shemale porn. Roof Flashing

However, in low-slope roofing systems it appication easier for water applicaton accumulate. Underlayment should be installed from Thigh high platform boot lovers bottom of the pitched roof to the top, such that each upper layer overlaps the lower layer. Step flashings on a cedar shake roof are typically installed every inches. Step flashings flashng quite often improperly installed on the exterior of siding. View Digital Edition. Some types of roofing materials like concrete tile incorporate a continuous sheet of metal Step flashing application at sidewalls. Well engineered and properly installed two-part flashing can handle Step flashing application movement with no problem. Skip to main content. In certain instances flashing may need to be installed on the exterior of siding. The best way to learn proper flashing techniques is to spend time with an experienced craftsman as he installs a complete roof. Also, remember that both temperature and humidity can cause roofing materials shingles, wood sheathing, flashing to expand and contract with seasonal flashint. Then replace and fasten the flashing, and reinstall the shingles with the proper overlapping procedure. Obviously, the further up the wall a flashing extends the greater the resistance to water intrusion.

Flashing refers to thin pieces of impervious material installed to prevent the passage of water into a structure from a joint or as part of a weather resistant barrier system.

  • Step flashing is used to provide a water tight connection where roofing adjoins a vertical juncture.
  • Anywhere surfaces intersect on a roof is a prime spot for water seepage.
  • Originally published by : Journal of Light Construction — July 16,

This series covers roof framing, roofing materials, the attic, and the conditions that affect the roofing materials and components, including wind and hail. Headwall flashing should extend up behind the exterior wall covering and down over the roof-covering material, as you see here.

Flashing should overlap the roof-covering material, but on asphalt shingle roofs, for aesthetic reasons, the part of the headwall flashing that extends down over asphalt shingles is often covered with a course of shingle tabs. Common flange sizes are 4 inches by 5 inches. Wind-driven rain can enter at these gaps, causing roof leaks.

Except where walls are brick, the vertical part of the sidewall flashing should extend up behind the exterior wall covering, just like with headwalls. Sidewalls on roofs covered with asphalt shingles, wood shingles, shakes and slate should be flashed using step flashing, like you see here.

All shingle manufacturers require step flashing at sidewalls for both asphalt, wood and slate. This is an example of a defective installation where an asphalt shingle roof meets a stone sidewall. Instead of installing the step flashing between shingles, the flashing rests on top of the shingles.

Sealant will eventually dry, shrink and crack. When you see it, you should recommend replacement with proper flashing, or annual inspection and re-application of an appropriate sealant, as necessary. You can probably lift the butt of the lowest tile enough to see. Step flashing size requirements vary according to manufacturer. The vertical side will be hidden behind the exterior wall-covering material.

Without a gap, the exterior wall covering can wick up moisture from the roof. This can lead to decay, delamination, peeling paint, and other problems. This condition is especially common on roofs with multiple layers of shingles. The gap can be present but difficult to see on tile roofs. You can see it in this photo if you look at the base of the sidewall just to the left of the downspout termination.

Unless the pan flashing is fairly wide, this may allow enough moisture entry to cause a leak, and it should be mentioned in your inspection report.

At the inside corner, the headwall flashing that extends out over the tile was not installed high enough. All rights reserved. Terms of Use Find an Inspector.

In certain instances flashing may need to be installed on the exterior of siding. This method of installation channels the water out and down, away from the wood-panel sheathing below. All roofing systems are made of a number of different components: roof sheathing, underlayment, roofing material, roof intersections, flashing details and ventilation. The force of gravity drives the water into every imperfection in the waterproofing system. Coat the flashing with a zinc-based primer followed by two or more coats of spray-on, rust-preventive metal paint. No Clear Directions To complicate matters, the new provision allowing the use of continuous flashing at sidewalls is rather vague and provides few installation details beyond the need for the vertical leg of the flashing to be at least 4 inches tall and for the flashing to divert water away from the side wall using some sort of kick-out flashing. The flashing materials will continue to be leak-proof if they can withstand this movement of the roofing materials.

Step flashing application

Step flashing application

Step flashing application

Step flashing application

Step flashing application. Free Newsletter Signup

In this case, continuous flashing is simply a single piece of flashing placed behind the exterior cladding and weather-resistive barrier on the wall and then extended out over the shingles. To complicate matters, the new provision allowing the use of continuous flashing at sidewalls is rather vague and provides few installation details beyond the need for the vertical leg of the flashing to be at least 4 inches tall and for the flashing to divert water away from the side wall using some sort of kick-out flashing.

After decades of sidewall step flashing being installed beneath the shingles, continuous flashing is most likely to be installed below the shingles as well. But some installers may assume that continuous flashing should be installed above the shingles, as is done for headwall flashing. The IRC offers nothing to clarify this issue. In those applications, the continuous flashing installs under the roofing.

Those roof coverings are meant to provide protection from bulk water movement only, with the expectation that moisture will find its way beneath the roofing and that the underlayment will provide the final protection. Industry standards and manufacturer installation instructions for clay and slate also specify that the continuous sidewall flashing have a J-roll along the edge under the shingles and over the roof deck.

The small roll along the long edge of the continuous flashing helps to ensure that water will flow down to the bottom of the flashing and not migrate sideways and off the flashing. This roll is effective for clay and slate roofing because those products are usually elevated on horizontal battens. Asphalt shingles, however, are not rigid like clay or slate, and a J-roll would likely telegraph a hump to the finished surface.

Additionally, asphalt shingles would not protect the J-roll from getting flattened by someone walking on the roof. But the IRC does not mention a J-roll along the edge of continuous flashing in an asphalt-shingle application. After all this information was discussed with plenty of opposition in the hearings and again in , the measure was still approved. But because this new subject is not clearly spelled out in the code, I would encourage you to do a little homework before trying to change the decades-long practice of using step flashing with asphalt shingles.

Review the installation instructions of the product you are installing and perhaps contact a technical representative at the manufacturer for guidance for an alternative installation method that uses continuous flashing. Then follow whatever details the manufacturer provides. But perhaps the easiest solution is to leave well enough alone and continue using the tried-and-true step-flashing method.

SBC Magazine appreciates your input, and continually seeks to improve the value it provides to the market. If you have any comments or corrections on this article, please email us and we can publish your comments. Skip to main content. Building Science. Obviously, the further up the wall a flashing extends the greater the resistance to water intrusion.

Likewise, the narrower the flashing, the less resistant it is to water intrusion. Click here for illustrations of flashings. A lot of roofing education and roofing resources are also available in our Roofing Repair Blog check it out! Proper installation of flashing behind siding Common mistakes involving step flashing: Installation of a continuous sheet of metal flashing from the top of the roof to the bottom of the roof in lieu of step flashing is not a correct method of installation in many instances.

Some types of roofing materials like concrete tile incorporate a continuous sheet of metal flashing at sidewalls. But, composition shingles, cedar shakes, cedar shingles, and other materials that are installed in rows or courses typically require step flashing at vertical junctures.

So, avoid installation of a continuous sheet of metal flashing for those roofing materials which require step flashing. If in doubt, refer to the installation instructions of the material being installed. Omitting installation of new step flashings when a new roof is installed over an existing roof. This method of installation relies upon the step flashings of the underlying roof to continue providing a water tight connection with the adjoining sidewall.

There are a couple of big concerns. First of all, the integrity of the new roof is dependent upon the integrity of the old roof. And secondly, failing to install one step flashing per course of new shingles does not meet building code or shingle manufacturer installation guidelines. Step flashings are quite often improperly installed on the exterior of siding.

Originally published by : Journal of Light Construction — July 16, The following article was produced and published by the source linked to above, who is solely responsible for its content.

As a consequence, SBC cannot vouch for the validity of any facts, claims or opinions made in the article. The development of the International Codes is a continuous process, with each code volume being revised on a three-year cycle. Changes are submitted and approved and can then be reviewed in subsequent cycles. Controversial changes get people and the building industry thinking, which is what happened recently with the way code looks at sidewall flashing in asphalt-shingle installations.

Step flashing has been required for asphalt shingles at roof-to-wall intersections as far back as the CABO. With this method, L-shaped pieces of metal that are a couple of inches longer than the shingle overlap are installed on top of each shingle adjacent to the sidewall, and the flashing is then laced into each course.

Step flashing ensures that any water that migrates underneath a shingle will still end up on top of the flashing that is covering the shingle below. The water can then drain away safely. In addition to the CABO reference, the requirement for step flashing at sidewalls appeared in the first edition of the International Residential Code IRC and remained unchanged through the edition.

But things changed in In the IRC, the section that covered sidewall flashing was much expanded, and for the first time, it included continuous flashing as an approved method for roof-to-sidewall flashing with asphalt shingles. Continuous flashing has always been used at a headwall an intersecting wall at the top of a roof plane and perpendicular to the slope.

In this case, continuous flashing is simply a single piece of flashing placed behind the exterior cladding and weather-resistive barrier on the wall and then extended out over the shingles. To complicate matters, the new provision allowing the use of continuous flashing at sidewalls is rather vague and provides few installation details beyond the need for the vertical leg of the flashing to be at least 4 inches tall and for the flashing to divert water away from the side wall using some sort of kick-out flashing.

After decades of sidewall step flashing being installed beneath the shingles, continuous flashing is most likely to be installed below the shingles as well.

But some installers may assume that continuous flashing should be installed above the shingles, as is done for headwall flashing. The IRC offers nothing to clarify this issue. In those applications, the continuous flashing installs under the roofing.

Those roof coverings are meant to provide protection from bulk water movement only, with the expectation that moisture will find its way beneath the roofing and that the underlayment will provide the final protection. Industry standards and manufacturer installation instructions for clay and slate also specify that the continuous sidewall flashing have a J-roll along the edge under the shingles and over the roof deck.

The small roll along the long edge of the continuous flashing helps to ensure that water will flow down to the bottom of the flashing and not migrate sideways and off the flashing. This roll is effective for clay and slate roofing because those products are usually elevated on horizontal battens. Asphalt shingles, however, are not rigid like clay or slate, and a J-roll would likely telegraph a hump to the finished surface.

Additionally, asphalt shingles would not protect the J-roll from getting flattened by someone walking on the roof. But the IRC does not mention a J-roll along the edge of continuous flashing in an asphalt-shingle application. After all this information was discussed with plenty of opposition in the hearings and again in , the measure was still approved. But because this new subject is not clearly spelled out in the code, I would encourage you to do a little homework before trying to change the decades-long practice of using step flashing with asphalt shingles.

Review the installation instructions of the product you are installing and perhaps contact a technical representative at the manufacturer for guidance for an alternative installation method that uses continuous flashing. Then follow whatever details the manufacturer provides.

But perhaps the easiest solution is to leave well enough alone and continue using the tried-and-true step-flashing method. SBC Magazine appreciates your input, and continually seeks to improve the value it provides to the market. If you have any comments or corrections on this article, please email us and we can publish your comments.

Skip to main content. Building Science. Energy Efficiency. Originally published by : Journal of Light Construction — July 16, The following article was produced and published by the source linked to above, who is solely responsible for its content.

Step flashing Through History Step flashing has been required for asphalt shingles at roof-to-wall intersections as far back as the CABO.

Enter Continuous Flashing In the IRC, the section that covered sidewall flashing was much expanded, and for the first time, it included continuous flashing as an approved method for roof-to-sidewall flashing with asphalt shingles.

No Clear Directions To complicate matters, the new provision allowing the use of continuous flashing at sidewalls is rather vague and provides few installation details beyond the need for the vertical leg of the flashing to be at least 4 inches tall and for the flashing to divert water away from the side wall using some sort of kick-out flashing.

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Step flashing application