Baritone brass mouthpiece-Carlton Trombone/Baritone Mouthpiece - AL - Long & McQuade Musical Instruments

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Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

This item is currently out of stock but is most likely in stock with our suppliers. Refresh comments list. Jones is a Willson artist, so he chose the "E" Euro shank. Scott Whitfield Signature Model. S 47 Baritone brass mouthpiece at progressing players, these mouthpiece provide an affordable step-up option for players looking to upgrade their mouthpiece. However, players sometimes find the fit is loose in other flugelhorn brands and models. The mouthhpiece selling model for all-around playing for tenor trombone. Introduced to Gay friendly dentist michigan Warburton 5G "L".

Washable leather coat for teens. Parts of a brass mouthpiece

We are [blocked]. Many cornet players also play the trumpet, regardless of moutnpiece instrument they start off on. While important to sound, feel, and performance, the throat and backbore are matched to the cup and Sex in da city calgary by the mouthpiece manufacturer and are of less concern. If you fatigue Baritone brass mouthpiece the high range, then a better long-term fix is to develop more strength. They have a lot of testimonials and Baritone brass mouthpiece brass players that endorse them, so I have no reason to be skeptical of their claims that these improvements do what they say. A rim with a fairly flat contour allows even lip pressure across its surface. Bqritone in the taper of the mouthpiece are made to fit a particular style of receiver. View the full line of brass mouthpiece accessories from Musician's Friend. Using a U-shaped cup and V-shaped throat, the Yamaha Alain Trudel Mouthpiece produces warmth during intense fortissimo passages. The quick answer to the question is that it depends.

How to find the right trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, trombone, French horn or other brass instrument mouthpiece that makes sense for your music, budget and skill level.

  • This is one of the most overwhelming topics in low brass playing.
  • How to find the right trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, trombone, French horn or other brass instrument mouthpiece that makes sense for your music, budget and skill level.
  • .

For more than a generation, Schilke trombone mouthpiece models have been accepted as the top choice for the serious trombone or euphonium player. These classic models feature comfortable rim profiles and unique cup shapes. Symphony Series Large Bore Tenor Trombone and Bass Trombone Mouthpieces Based on our standard trombone mouthpiece models, the Symphony Series Tenor Trombone and Bass Trombone models have modified rim contours, cup shapes, throats and backbores creating a responsive balance in resistance and blowing freedom along with attack clarity that will appeal to the contemporary trombonist.

Schilke Symphony Series mouthpieces continue a tradition in outstanding Schilke workmanship combining old world craftsmanship with the demands of the modern brass player. Symphony Series 5. Symphony Series 6. These contoured alto trombone mouthpieces are designed in two models.

Both are offered in a modified contour which offers the player clarity of sound with crisp articulations. Bass Trombone Mouthpiece This mouthpiece offers an efficient and comfortable design, is full of color, and even in feel from the highest range through to the lowest pedal tones. Standard Series For more than a generation, Schilke trombone mouthpiece models have been accepted as the top choice for the serious trombone or euphonium player.

Model mm inches throat Description Shank 40B This mouthpiece, with its wide-rounded rim, works well for the trumpet player who doubles on trombone. S 40 In addition, the tone has considerable projection.

It is excellent for the bass trumpet and valve trombone. S 42B S 42 S 43A S 44E4 S L 45B S 45 Ideally suited for the beginner trombone player. S 46 S L 46D S L 47B S 47 S L 47C4 The Schilke standard options make this a fine all- around mouthpiece.

S L 50C4 S L 51B Ideally suited for large bore tenor and orchestral performers. S L 51D It is particularly suited for the Euphonium, producing a full dark tone. S L 52D Also a good choice for the Euphonium player requiring a larger diameter than the 51D. Also a good choice for Euphonium player requiring more cup volume than the 52D. Bass Trombone Specifications. Model mm inches throat Description Shank 57 B 58 B 59 B 60 Model throat Description Shank M5.

Resistance variables are ideal for a principal player. More open than D5. Model throat Description Shank M6. It is an efficient, even playing mouthpiece that provides brilliance for maximum projection when desired. This is an ideal choice for bass trombones that are exceptionally free blowing, such as Greenhoe Bass Trombones or bass trombones with dual bore slides. Maintaining efficiency, this extra large bowl provides more depth to the sound core with clarity and consistency at all dynamic levels.

Model throat Description Shank 4. This mouthpiece enhances the higher overtones for a lighter and brighter concept of tone color. Similar to our 47B. Notes center and slot with a pure clarity to the sound. Also useful as an orchestral mouthpiece when blend with larger bore tenors and bass are of utmost importance. Slightly bigger than a 47B.

Since the cup diameter is small, the upper register is improved. Contour profile — this mouthpiece was designed for the lead trombone player desiring an easy high register. Contour profile — designed for the lead trombone player with a larger cup volume than the 43A.

The semi-flat rim has a high point close to the center of the mouthpiece which allows for a great deal of flexibility. The cup diameter and volume is slightly larger than the 46, producing a full, resonant tone.

Contour profile — This mouthpiece is a good all-around mouthpiece for the jazz player that is requiring quick response and a resonant high register. For both professionals and students alike, this outstanding mouthpiece combines good response with superior tone quality and intonation. Particularly adapted to the medium and large-bore tenor trombones. The medium-deep cup and medium-wide rim make this mouthpiece an outstanding choice for medium and large-bore tenor trombones, combining a rich, full sound with a high level of efficiency and playability.

A large bowl shaped cup producing a rich tone quality. Similar to the 51 with a slightly shallower cup and semi-flat 4 rim. Slightly larger diameter than the 51, this mouthpiece produces a slightly broader sound. This combination of large cup diameter and bowl shape is widely favored by those who desire a rich full sound. This model is an excellent choice For those who play tenor and bass trombone.

A highly recommended mouthpiece for those who double on tenor and bass, and the full-time bass trombonist, combining both good intonation with great lower and upper registers.

An outstanding mouthpiece for the full-time bass trombonist, combining great intonation with excellent lower and upper registers. Our largest bass mouthpiece offering a full body of sound for the experienced player. A Medium Shallow Cup that provides more brilliance, and projection due to additional high overtones in the sound core.

A Standard cup shape that provides a deeper bottom to the sound core and excellent articulation clarity. A Medium Shallow Cup that provides more brilliance with a larger rim diameter than the 5. This medium deep cup is similar to a standard 59 model yet maintains the rim diameter of a The M6.

Slightly more open feel than a standard Schilke 60 while maintaining the same rim diameter. Created for Alto Trombone, the 4.

Going too shallow, however, can kill volume and flexibility. It is used mainly in marching, military, and brass bands. It is pretty medium sized all-around. Alternatively, some French horn mouthpieces use a somewhat shallower U-shaped cup, which add some brightness to the tone and makes the upper register easier to handle. Should you consider a gold-plated mouthpiece?

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece

Baritone brass mouthpiece. Table of Contents

The general rule is that the number refers to the rim and the letter refers to the cup depth. Unfortunately, the numbers go in reverse, so the bigger the number, the smaller the rim size, which can be confusing.

The lettering is a bit stranger. Other than that, everyone does their own thing. The shank size matters. This determines if the mouthpiece will even fit in the leadpipe of your instrument. Before you can even think about numbers and sizes of mouthpieces, you have to know what type of instrument you have.

If you have a standard tenor trombone, baritone, or student-intermediate euphonium, you probably have a small shank.

If you have a professional tenor trombone or euphonium, you probably have a large shank. But things get weirder. If you play bass trombone, this will be a different shank than a large shank tenor trombone. The quick answer to the question is that it depends. If you play euphonium, you might not be able to borrow a trombone mouthpiece or even a mouthpiece from another euphonium player in your band. So, you just started or are just coming back to low brass playing.

Remember, there is no one-size-fits-all. It is pretty medium sized all-around. The best is the one that produces the sound you want. Jazz players tend to want brighter sounds, more flexibility, and the ability to solo.

You will want a larger throat and a thinner, rounded rim to easily get different tone. If you find yourself in the upper register a lot, you can also consider a smaller rim size. I feel obligated to put this in here, because I hear this question a lot.

If you think about a mouthpiece, it is perfectly symmetrical. The rim itself is flat put the rim on a table, and every part of the rim touches the table. The side-to-side width of the cup is smaller than the top-to-bottom. So, you must put the orientation dot up. The rim has a contour that goes along with the natural shape of your teeth. Among other things, this is supposed to help with people who wear braces. They have a lot of testimonials and famous brass players that endorse them, so I have no reason to be skeptical of their claims that these improvements do what they say.

Oh, this debate has been going on forever. Should you consider a gold-plated mouthpiece? People make all sorts of claims about them. They have less feedback in large ensembles.

So, the best thing is to try it out and see if it works for you. French horn mouthpieces like the Laskey mouthpiece line, have a deep cup that produces a dark, mellow tone. The throat is the opening leading out of the cup. The throat's job is to let you push air from the cup and concentrate it into a stream with the right amount of back pressure providing tone control.

A bigger throat will allow you to blow harder and produce more volume, but it also will require more air pressure from your lungs and make playing soft passages more difficult. Most manufacturers design the throat to complement the cup and backbore design to achieve the best balance of tone and projection. But again, due to the many physical and skill-level differences among brass players, slight differences among these three elements can have a surprisingly big impact on sound and playability.

While important to sound, feel, and performance, the throat and backbore are matched to the cup and rim by the mouthpiece manufacturer and are of less concern. When all's said and done, most players will find that a mouthpiece with a medium cup and rim will suit them quite well. Armed with this information, along with the feedback from your mouth during play, you're ready to begin your search for the ideal mouthpiece.

While the structural elements of a mouthpiece are similar across all brass instrument types, there are significant variations among different models within an instrument category. If you are approaching the alto horn as a new player, the most suitable mouthpiece for you will largely depend on your background with brass instruments. On the other hand, those coming from a euphonium may feel more comfortable with a larger diameter that requires less adjustment from the larger euphonium mouthpiece.

Some alto horn mouthpieces, such as those in the Denis Wick Heritage Series come in multiple sizes, making it possible to match different playing needs with a single model. Other manufacturers make different models with specific characteristics for different styles.

See the entire selection of alto horn mouthpieces from Musician's Friend. Many cornet players also play the trumpet, regardless of which instrument they start off on. This is possible using adapters for cross-fitting the mouthpiece. However, while cross-fitting can be a good, economical approach for infrequent instrument doublers, it may yield less than ideal results in tone for those who use both instruments extensively. This is largely due to the different throat sizes between trumpet and cornet mouthpieces.

The Bach line of cornet mouthpieces comes in a wide variety of sizes to suit players of all types. Explore the full Musician's Friend selection of cornet mouthpieces. In addition to a noticeable wobble, it can cause poor intonation and response.

Differences in the taper of the mouthpiece are made to fit a particular style of receiver. Mouthpieces like the Bach Mega Tone are highly regarded choices for Bach flugelhorns. However, players sometimes find the fit is loose in other flugelhorn brands and models. The Denis Wick Flugelhorn Mouthpiece has a very deep cup for a rich tone and a standard taper that fits most contemporary instruments. Explore the full selection of flugelhorn mouthpieces at Musician's Friend.

And this variation is most pronounced in the shape of the cup. Many of the most popular mouthpieces, such as the Yamaha Standard Series , have a deep V-shaped cup, which is considered to produce a more mellow tone with a more pronounced low-frequency response. Alternatively, some French horn mouthpieces use a somewhat shallower U-shaped cup, which add some brightness to the tone and makes the upper register easier to handle. Learn more with our French Horn Buying Guide. Some models, like the Stork Orval Series , have slight rounding on a V-shaped cup to warm up tone.

In contrast, the Schilke Standard Series French Horn Mouthpiece has a slight curve that helps balance mellow tone with greater response on higher notes. This route is budget-friendly and with its a relatively shallow cup depth, a French horn mouthpiece may be manageable on a mellophone.

A better option is to use a mouthpiece specifically designed for the instrument, which generally uses a more shallow, bell-shaped cup that makes the instrument easier to control and keep intonated. For more options, check out the entire Musician's Friend selection of mellophone mouthpieces. When it comes to the trombone, and similarly voiced brass instruments, the context a player will be performing in matters greatly in the selection of the right mouthpiece.

This typically comes from a deeper, rounded cup shape. The Faxx Trombone Mouthpiece Series are an example of this style. In jazz, where players are more free to carve out an individualized sound, larger, more shallow cups are a popular option for opening up the range of the instrument and brightening its tone.

Using a U-shaped cup and V-shaped throat, the Yamaha Alain Trudel Mouthpiece produces warmth during intense fortissimo passages. The baritone horn is a low brass instrument.

They look like small tubas or euphoniums but play in a higher rage. Some marching bands and bugle corps use marching baritone horns, which play like a trumpet.

Although they are not generally used in jazz, shallow mouthpieces—like the Denis Wick Steven Mead Baritone Mouthpiece —are favored by soloist baritone horn players.

The euphonium is an even lower, baritone-voiced instrument that looks and sounds like a small tuba. It is used mainly in marching, military, and brass bands. As with other brass mouthpieces, a larger, deeper bowl—like the Yamaha Standard Series Euphonium Mouthpieces —will provide a deeper tone and greater volume. A shallow bowl will produce a more acute, brighter sound, favored by many soloists. Another popular option among soloists is the Denis Wick Euphonium Mouthpiece , which features the shallow bowl design favored by musicians doing lead work in an ensemble.

View the complete selections of trombone, baritone horn, and euphonium mouthpieces at Musician's Friend. As with trombonists, trumpet players choose their mouthpieces partly based on the context they will be playing in. They use deeper cups for mellow, orchestral playing, and shallower ones for jazz or soloing.

John Packer 6BS Trombone / Baritone Horn Mouthpiece (Small Shank)

How to find the right trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn, trombone, French horn or other brass instrument mouthpiece that makes sense for your music, budget and skill level. Need More Guidance? Every brass player should have an understanding of how their mouthpiece works and what they need from it. Without some guidance, though, it can take years of experimentation for players to discover what type of mouthpiece best suits their music and playing style.

A good mouthpiece will give the player a tone that is firm and compact with good projection. It also will be comfortable to play, helping you develop a better embouchure and more precise technique. Since players rarely have exactly the same shape lip and mouth anatomy, there are many variations in mouthpiece design to meet nearly everyone's needs. For students, medium-sized mouthpieces typically offer the best starting point. As your embouchure and abilities develop, you may gravitate toward either a larger or smaller mouthpiece, but many professionals play medium-size models their entire career.

The many variations in construction influence tone, projection and playing comfort. Mouthpieces for the different brass instruments vary in size, shape and other characteristics, but share similar design elements and components.

Understanding how these elements affect tone and playability will help you zero in on the level of comfort, ease of play, and type of tone you want. Every brass mouthpiece consists of the rim, cup, throat, and backbore. The rim is the round edge of the mouthpiece that you place your lips against to play your horn, and it is one of the most crucial parts to consider.

A rim with a fairly flat contour allows even lip pressure across its surface. It also provides a good air seal and feels comfortable, but it doesn't offer much flexibility. Rounded rim mouthpieces, on the other hand, offer a lot of flexibility, allowing the lips to move back and forth in the cup allowing the player to produce a greater variety of tones and effects.

However, rounded rims also require more lip pressure and muscular lips to play. Players without the air volume and embouchure needed will end up pressing too hard against their lips, cutting off circulation and ultimately limiting the flexibility gained from using a rounded rim, defeating its purpose. What many players, especially beginners prefer, is a medium-wide rim with a semi-rounded contour and a slightly sharp inner edge.

This provides sufficient surface for comfortable lip pressure while offering the lip movement needed to produce a wide range of tones. The cup is the area inside the rim that the player blows into. Generally, the larger and deeper the cup, the darker the tone and greater the volume the instrument can produce. Large cups require lots of control, which can quickly tire a player. In contrast, smaller and shallower cups brighten the tone, improve control and response, and ultimately require less effort.

Going too shallow, however, can kill volume and flexibility. The diameter of the cup is also an important consideration. Benefits include a more uniform response across all registers and easier lip control, resulting in more flexibility.

French horn mouthpieces like the Laskey mouthpiece line, have a deep cup that produces a dark, mellow tone. The throat is the opening leading out of the cup. The throat's job is to let you push air from the cup and concentrate it into a stream with the right amount of back pressure providing tone control.

A bigger throat will allow you to blow harder and produce more volume, but it also will require more air pressure from your lungs and make playing soft passages more difficult. Most manufacturers design the throat to complement the cup and backbore design to achieve the best balance of tone and projection. But again, due to the many physical and skill-level differences among brass players, slight differences among these three elements can have a surprisingly big impact on sound and playability.

While important to sound, feel, and performance, the throat and backbore are matched to the cup and rim by the mouthpiece manufacturer and are of less concern. When all's said and done, most players will find that a mouthpiece with a medium cup and rim will suit them quite well. Armed with this information, along with the feedback from your mouth during play, you're ready to begin your search for the ideal mouthpiece. While the structural elements of a mouthpiece are similar across all brass instrument types, there are significant variations among different models within an instrument category.

If you are approaching the alto horn as a new player, the most suitable mouthpiece for you will largely depend on your background with brass instruments. On the other hand, those coming from a euphonium may feel more comfortable with a larger diameter that requires less adjustment from the larger euphonium mouthpiece. Some alto horn mouthpieces, such as those in the Denis Wick Heritage Series come in multiple sizes, making it possible to match different playing needs with a single model.

Other manufacturers make different models with specific characteristics for different styles. See the entire selection of alto horn mouthpieces from Musician's Friend.

Many cornet players also play the trumpet, regardless of which instrument they start off on. This is possible using adapters for cross-fitting the mouthpiece. However, while cross-fitting can be a good, economical approach for infrequent instrument doublers, it may yield less than ideal results in tone for those who use both instruments extensively.

This is largely due to the different throat sizes between trumpet and cornet mouthpieces. The Bach line of cornet mouthpieces comes in a wide variety of sizes to suit players of all types. Explore the full Musician's Friend selection of cornet mouthpieces.

In addition to a noticeable wobble, it can cause poor intonation and response. Differences in the taper of the mouthpiece are made to fit a particular style of receiver. Mouthpieces like the Bach Mega Tone are highly regarded choices for Bach flugelhorns. However, players sometimes find the fit is loose in other flugelhorn brands and models.

The Denis Wick Flugelhorn Mouthpiece has a very deep cup for a rich tone and a standard taper that fits most contemporary instruments. Explore the full selection of flugelhorn mouthpieces at Musician's Friend. And this variation is most pronounced in the shape of the cup. Many of the most popular mouthpieces, such as the Yamaha Standard Series , have a deep V-shaped cup, which is considered to produce a more mellow tone with a more pronounced low-frequency response.

Alternatively, some French horn mouthpieces use a somewhat shallower U-shaped cup, which add some brightness to the tone and makes the upper register easier to handle. Learn more with our French Horn Buying Guide. Some models, like the Stork Orval Series , have slight rounding on a V-shaped cup to warm up tone. In contrast, the Schilke Standard Series French Horn Mouthpiece has a slight curve that helps balance mellow tone with greater response on higher notes.

This route is budget-friendly and with its a relatively shallow cup depth, a French horn mouthpiece may be manageable on a mellophone. A better option is to use a mouthpiece specifically designed for the instrument, which generally uses a more shallow, bell-shaped cup that makes the instrument easier to control and keep intonated.

For more options, check out the entire Musician's Friend selection of mellophone mouthpieces. When it comes to the trombone, and similarly voiced brass instruments, the context a player will be performing in matters greatly in the selection of the right mouthpiece.

This typically comes from a deeper, rounded cup shape. The Faxx Trombone Mouthpiece Series are an example of this style.

In jazz, where players are more free to carve out an individualized sound, larger, more shallow cups are a popular option for opening up the range of the instrument and brightening its tone.

Using a U-shaped cup and V-shaped throat, the Yamaha Alain Trudel Mouthpiece produces warmth during intense fortissimo passages. The baritone horn is a low brass instrument. They look like small tubas or euphoniums but play in a higher rage. Some marching bands and bugle corps use marching baritone horns, which play like a trumpet.

Although they are not generally used in jazz, shallow mouthpieces—like the Denis Wick Steven Mead Baritone Mouthpiece —are favored by soloist baritone horn players. The euphonium is an even lower, baritone-voiced instrument that looks and sounds like a small tuba. It is used mainly in marching, military, and brass bands. As with other brass mouthpieces, a larger, deeper bowl—like the Yamaha Standard Series Euphonium Mouthpieces —will provide a deeper tone and greater volume.

A shallow bowl will produce a more acute, brighter sound, favored by many soloists. Another popular option among soloists is the Denis Wick Euphonium Mouthpiece , which features the shallow bowl design favored by musicians doing lead work in an ensemble. View the complete selections of trombone, baritone horn, and euphonium mouthpieces at Musician's Friend. As with trombonists, trumpet players choose their mouthpieces partly based on the context they will be playing in.

They use deeper cups for mellow, orchestral playing, and shallower ones for jazz or soloing. Learn more with our Trumpet Buying Guide. The large variety of trumpet mouthpieces available today makes the multiple-mouthpiece approach sensible. You can choose from weighted, deep designs like the Schilke Heavyweight to the super-shallow Jet-Tone BC Classic Re-issue , favored by fleet-fingered soloists looking for the utmost in response.

See the entire range of trumpet mouthpieces from Musician's Friend. Like the instrument, mouthpieces designed for tuba are larger than others in the brass section. But just like other low brass mouthpieces, available models are varied so as to allow tuba players to fine-tune their preferences. Tuba mouthpieces come in two different styles: a more funnel-shaped and narrow design exemplified by the Conn Helleberg , and a more bell-shaped and wide design exemplified by the Perantucci mouthpieces.

For tuba students, the right design is largely a matter of which style is more comfortable; you may find you have a strong preference for one over the other. The sousaphone is a type of tuba especially designed to be played while standing or walking. As a specialized type of tuba, the sousaphone uses very similar mouthpieces. Faxx Tuba and Sousaphone Mouthpieces can be used on either instrument to produce a warm, full sound.

Your mouthpiece is a critical part of your instrument and needs special care, proper storage, and regular cleaning. One accessory you definitely need is a case for proper storage and protection.

The Bach Nylon Quad Pouch is ideal for multi-instrumentalists with its thickly padded space for four mouthpieces. The Protec Trombone Mouthpiece Protector is a simple accessory that helps keep your trombone mouthpiece clean and free from dents. View the full line of brass mouthpiece accessories from Musician's Friend. Specs only tell you so much. Mouthpiece returns are subject to a sterilization fee.

Baritone brass mouthpiece